Post #20: #OscarSoWhite

oscars-2016-chris-rock

Last night Chris Rock addressed the Oscar controversy regarding the lack of POC representation in the Oscars and by extension in Hollywood itself. You can see the entire monologue below:

 

To put it into context, see this post by Brandon Blackburn-Dwyer below.

Brandon Blackburn-Dwyer: Hollywood Should represent all of Us! The Truth of #OscarSoWhite

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:

Post #15: #BuzzWordsBeDamned
Post #16: Listen and Learn . . . 
Post #17: Comprehensive List of LGBTQ+ Term Definitions
Post #18: Discussion: Body Positivity in YA – Where’s the Love for Curvy Women?
Post #19: Beyonce in Formation

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #19: Beyonce in Formation

beyonce

I’d like to share a post that followed the release of Beyonce’s Formation video and her Super Bowl performance. I know many though that was no place for a political statement, regardless that the white performer (lead singer of Coldplay) literally wore his political statement on his arm. The problem wasn’t the political statement, but that it wasn’t a statement for the white masses.

This post puts Bey’s Formation in context. The context of what it means to Black America.

“. . . this critique is just further proof that African-Americans can’t have anything or express ourselves fully without first considering if we’re “race-baiting” white America.” – Priscilla Ward

It’s time for White America to take a step back from their outrage and take a cold hard look at racism in this country. Start by listening to Black Americans. You don’t have to agree, but it is imperative to fix the problems in this country that we attempt to understand where others are coming from. We, White America, have had the front of the stage for so long, it’s time we listened to other voices.

“The backlash to “Formation” is proof that even in 2016, black artists have to make anything, especially something as wildly popular as a new Beyoncé song performed at the most mainstream of all TV events, the Super Bowl, about white America’s feelings and politics — even when the song is about anything but that.” – Priscilla Ward

Maybe, just maybe, this song wasn’t for White America. And you know what, that’s okay.

Priscilla Ward: White Beyonce haters don’t get it: “Formation” isn’t “race-baiting” – but it is unapologetically about race

 

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:

Post #14: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices
Post #15: #BuzzWordsBeDamned
Post #16: Listen and Learn . . . 
Post #17: Comprehensive List of LGBTQ+ Term Definitions
Post #18: Discussion: Body Positivity in YA – Where’s the Love for Curvy Women?

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #18: Discussion: Body Positivity in YA – Where’s the Love For Curvy Women?

wonder women

I know, this is another blog post about YA books, but so much of what we authors discuss pertaining to books can also be applied to real life. This one’s about body positivity, being comfortable in our own skin and the image society provides for us about what’s normal.

Lillie Marcheggiani: Discussion: Body Positivity in YA – Where’s the Love For Curvy Women?

Lenten Challenge 2016
Post #2: Coming Out Again, and Again, and Again . . .
Post #3: Dalia Mogahed and why she wears a hijab
Post #4: Why diversity in Children’s Literature really Matters
Post #5: The Emotional Toll of Growing Up Black in America
Post #6: Picture from the Box
Post #7: Diversity 101
Post #8: Study examines television, diversity and self-esteem
Post #9: Growing up Muslim in America
Post #10: White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack
Post #11: Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person
Post #12: It’s a Choice! Oh Shit!
Post #13: Representation Matters
Post #14: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices
Post #15: #BuzzWordsBeDamned
Post #16: Listen and Learn . . . 
Post #17: Comprehensive List of LGBTQ+ Term Definitions

*Please remember to leave the blogs I share as you find them. Let’s learn together.*

Post #17: Comprehensive List of LGBTQ+ Term Definitions

lgbt-concept-word-cloud-123rf-com

I know for many people, especially those who may not know people in the LGBT Community, the list of terms and identifications pertaining to LGBT+ individuals is a mystery. Here’s a list that may help educate you on how people besides cisgender persons identify themselves.

Comprehensive List of LGBTQ+ Term Definitions

Lenten Challenge 2016
Post #2: Coming Out Again, and Again, and Again . . .
Post #3: Dalia Mogahed and why she wears a hijab
Post #4: Why diversity in Children’s Literature really Matters
Post #5: The Emotional Toll of Growing Up Black in America
Post #6: Picture from the Box
Post #7: Diversity 101
Post #8: Study examines television, diversity and self-esteem
Post #9: Growing up Muslim in America
Post #10: White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack
Post #11: Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person
Post #12: It’s a Choice! Oh Shit!
Post #13: Representation Matters
Post #14: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices
Post #15: #BuzzWordsBeDamned
Post #16: Listen and Learn . . . 

Post #16: Listen and Learn . . .

Shannon Hale, author of Princess Academy, Ever After, Austenland & more

Shannon Hale, author of Princess Academy, Ever After, Austenland & more

Today’s post is a link to a Twitter thread Shannon Hale, NYT Bestselling author, created. In it she specifically talks about how white authors can be a positive force in the push for diversity in children’s literature, but I think it speaks beyond the interest of a writer. It’s something we can all try to do in our everyday lives and interactions with others: listen and learn.

Shannon Hale Diversity

Read the whole thread. It isn’t long, but I think what Shannon says above is one of the most important things you can do. Surround yourself with voices that teach you something, even if you don’t agree with everything that is said.

In a pond with no movement, we stagnate. But in a river fed with flowing water, we travel to new places.

Shannon Hale: Listen and Learn

Lenten Challenge 2016
Post #2: Coming Out Again, and Again, and Again . . .
Post #3: Dalia Mogahed and why she wears a hijab
Post #4: Why diversity in Children’s Literature really Matters
Post #5: The Emotional Toll of Growing Up Black in America
Post #6: Picture from the Box
Post #7: Diversity 101
Post #8: Study examines television, diversity and self-esteem
Post #9: Growing up Muslim in America
Post #10: White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack
Post #11: Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person
Post #12: It’s a Choice! Oh Shit!
Post #13: Representation Matters
Post #14: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices
Post #15: #BuzzWordsBeDamned

Post #15: #BuzzWordsBeDamned

I’m going to make this one super easy today. No links to click on. Just a screenshot of a Tweet I happened to like:

Buzzwords

Lenten Challenge 2016
Post #2: Coming Out Again, and Again, and Again . . .
Post #3: Dalia Mogahed and why she wears a hijab
Post #4: Why diversity in Children’s Literature really Matters
Post #5: The Emotional Toll of Growing Up Black in America
Post #6: Picture from the Box
Post #7: Diversity 101
Post #8: Study examines television, diversity and self-esteem
Post #9: Growing up Muslim in America
Post #10: White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack
Post #11: Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person
Post #12: It’s a Choice! Oh Shit!
Post #13: Representation Matters
Post #14: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices

Post #14: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices

I came across a Twitter thread on February 11th I wanted to share. So often we “help” people from a place of sympathy or even pity. But when the work gets hard we can go back to our lives without feeling the weight of racism, bigotry, religious persecution or having to deal with a disability. India Valentine, a writer and disability advocate who handles her own disability, posted this thread speaking to the need for allies and non-disabled advocates to understand the need for the disabled to speak for themselves.

I challenge you to read through the whole thread. It’s long, and you may have to click “Show More” as you finish a section, but her words are important. Remember, she’s not saying that the fight for the rights and accessibility for disabled persons doesn’t need allies and advocates, but rather the voices that need to be at the forefront of the movement should be voices of people who actually deal with the situation every day.

This thread, though specifically talking about #DisabledTwitter and disability in general, can be applied to so many injustices we see in the world. Yes, we need to step forward and help, even if this injustice does not directly affect us, but we also need to take a back seat and do the non-glorious work because the voices we need to hear, and the humanity we need to acknowledge, is that of the people who are directly affected.

India Valentine: #DisabledTwitter Needs to be Dominated by Disabled Voices

**This is one of those posts I’m going to strongly remind my readers to leave nothing behind on the sites I post. This challenge is about educating ourselves through the eyes of people unlike us, or maybe more like us than we realize. Experience a new point of view, but leave your point of view at home.**

Lenten Challenge 2016
Post #2: Coming Out Again, and Again, and Again . . .
Post #3: Dalia Mogahed and why she wears a hijab
Post #4: Why diversity in Children’s Literature really Matters
Post #5: The Emotional Toll of Growing Up Black in America
Post #6: Picture from the Box
Post #7: Diversity 101
Post #8: Study examines television, diversity and self-esteem
Post #9: Growing up Muslim in America
Post #10: White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack
Post #11: Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person
Post #12: It’s a Choice! Oh Shit!
Post #13: Representation Matters