Post #34: Growing Up Black and Jewish in America

This was an interesting read from the perspective of a woman with Jewish roots and how she explored and began to live in them. The first page and a short bit of the second are the article, and the rest are kosher recipes. There are blank spaces that look like the article ends, but keep scrolling to read the full text.

Laurie Ochoa: Growing Up Black and Jewish in America

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #29: Never assume that you’re magically free of prejudice . . .
Post #30: Intersectionality
Post #31: Almost Asian (But Not Quite)
Post #32: Accurate Representation
Post #33: 13 Tweets That Define What Growing Up as Lesbian Was Really Like

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #33: 13 Tweets That Define What Growing Up as Lesbian Was Really Like

lgbt-holding-hands

Ran across this short article on PRIDE about Tweets that reflect what it’s like for a girl to grow up as a lesbian. This is of course not an all encompassing report, but rather a peek into a few things that lesbian girls deal with growing up.

Yezmin Villarreal:  13 Tweets That Define What Growing Up as a Lesbian Was Really Like

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #28: DeRay McKesson: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement
Post #29: Never assume that you’re magically free of prejudice . . .
Post #30: Intersectionality
Post #31: Almost Asian (But Not Quite)
Post #32: Accurate Representation

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #32: Accurate Representation

Diversity Puzzle

I have talked several times and shared posts about needing diversity in children’s literature, and as before, I will state that this applies to more than just books. We need it in movies and our schools, music and history education, on the news and in our everyday lives. So though it may seem like I harp on one topic that doesn’t really apply to non-writers, it truly does. It applies to the books you buy for your kids, the movies they see, and who they see in important positions like teacher, principal, mayor, policeman, senator, president.

But another important aspect to needing diversity in our lives so that we see people and not “other”, is accurate representation. Though stereotypes can be found in real life, using stereotypes in our forms of media, and only stereotypes, is as damaging as no representation at all.

Please read the following post by Jessie Devine, a fellow writer, in which he discusses this topic.

Jessie Devine: Accurate Representation

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #27: When no gender fits: A quest to be just a person
Post #28: DeRay McKesson: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement
Post #29: Never assume that you’re magically free of prejudice . . .
Post #30: Intersectionality
Post #31: Almost Asian (But Not Quite)

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #31: Almost Asian (But Not Quite)

Today I would like to share an essay written by Heather Dewis of San Jose for an essay contest by the Asian Pacific Fund. It was one of the winners from 2015, and though there are several others that are worth reading, this one spoke to me. Not because I can relate to what she is feeling, but more because I can’t. Which is the point of this exercise: to see through the eyes of another person and try to understand experiences we may never have.

The first link will lead directly to Heather’s essay, but I’m going to leave the link below that leads to the master list of winning entries from Kindergarten through 12th Grade. There are some interesting reads in there and I encourage you to take a look if you have the time.

Heather Dewis: Almost Asian (But Not Quite)

Growing Up Asian in America Awards: Winning Entries

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #26: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’
Post #27: When no gender fits: A quest to be just a person
Post #28: DeRay McKesson: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement
Post #29: Never assume that you’re magically free of prejudice . . .
Post #30: Intersectionality

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #30: Intersectionality

Intersectionality Metaphor

I wanted to share an article from the Washington Post today. It deals with intersectionality and explains the history and the context of the term. If you haven’t heard it before I encourage you to read.

As an example, we often hear that women in America make around $0.79 to every dollar a man makes, but the gap for women of color is even more staggering:

wagegapbrokenupbyrace-011

This is just an example to highlight how discrimination in this country is affected by the intersectionality of identity factors. Please read Christine Emba’s article for more information:

Christine Emba: Intersectionality

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #25: We can disagree without attacking . . .
Post #26: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’
Post #27: When no gender fits: A quest to be just a person
Post #28: DeRay McKesson: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement
Post #29: Never assume that you’re magically free of prejudice . . .

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #29: Never assume that you’re magically free of prejudice . . .

Just a little something from a Twitter friend (I blocked out her name and picture) concerning our need to address our own prejudices and biases, even if we don’t think we have them.

Prejudice 1

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #24: 9 YA Authors Discuss Music, Chronic Illness, and More in March’s YA Open Mic
Post #25: We can disagree without attacking . . .
Post #26: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’
Post #27: When no gender fits: A quest to be just a person
Post #28: DeRay McKesson: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #28: DeRay McKesson: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement

Deray and trevor

DeRay has some interesting thins to say about racism and the Black Lives Matter movement if you’d like to learn a little more about him and what he is working for. (Sorry about the commercial before the clip. I couldn’t find one without it.)

DeRay McKesson with Trevor Noah on The Daily Show: Tackling Racism in the Black Lives Matter Movement

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #23: What You Imply When You Call a Disabled Person Inspiring
Post #24: 9 YA Authors Discuss Music, Chronic Illness, and More in March’s YA Open Mic
Post #25: We can disagree without attacking . . .
Post #26: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’
Post #27: When no gender fits: A quest to be just a person

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #26: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’

Autism

This is a great guest post by Natalie Breen who also writes for Autism Works Boston. It’s a wonderful insight into the life of a person who loves her brother with autism and is enriched by his presence in her life. I love what she says here:

Understand that a [person having a] disability does not give you the right to ever feel you are worthier than someone else.

And also here:

Autism exposes some tough, scary feelings. It forces you to reevaluate and abandon the life you may have envisioned and begin a new, untraveled, unplanned path.

Please read the full article below:

Natalie Breen: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #21: #OwnVoices: Why We Need Diverse Authors in Children’s Literature
Post #22: The Pain of Growing Up Muslim in Post-9/11 America
Post #23: What You Imply When You Call a Disabled Person Inspiring
Post #24: 9 YA Authors Discuss Music, Chronic Illness, and More in March’s YA Open Mic
Post #25: We can disagree without attacking . . .

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #27: When no gender fits: A quest to be seen as just a person

rainbow_flags__gender_non_binary_by_adcro-d9384tg

This one is a long one, but provides a true insight into the thoughts of a non-binary gender person and also from the perspective of their mother. I strongly encourage you to read all the way through. It’s a beautiful and informative read. (And look at Kelsey’s pictures too! Having a face to go with a story makes it so much more real and personal.)

Monica Hesse: When no gender fits: A quest to be seen as just a person

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #22: The Pain of Growing Up Muslim in Post-9/11 America
Post #23: What You Imply When You Call a Disabled Person Inspiring
Post #24: 9 YA Authors Discuss Music, Chronic Illness, and More in March’s YA Open Mic
Post #25: We can disagree without attacking . . .
Post #26: A Letter on ‘What It’s Like to Have a Sibling with Autism’

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*

Post #25:We can disagree without attacking . . .

This one isn’t so much about reading another person’s point of view, which is what this Lenten Challenge is about, but a reminder than we can try to listen to another person’s point of view.

Deray McKesson

And in today’s current political climate I think these words are extremely important.

*I am very behind on my Lent posts. I missed Saturday, Sunday and Monday, and though I have some planned, I haven’t had the time to write them. I will catch up and post a few extras to make up for the missed posts.*

*New readers may wonder why I’m sharing these posts and why they’re numbered. Here’s a link to my post I’m Giving Up HATE, PREJUDICE and INDIFFERENCE for Lent.

And here are my latest 5 posts in the series:
Post #20: #OscarSoWhite
Post #21: #OwnVoices: Why We Need Diverse Authors in Children’s Literature
Post #22: The Pain of Growing Up Muslim in Post-9/11 America
Post #23: What You Imply When You Call a Disabled Person Inspiring
Post #24: 9 YA Authors Discuss Music, Chronic Illness, and More in March’s YA Open Mic

*Please remember to leave the sites I post clean. We are here to learn, not debate. Even if you disagree, we need to learn that just because we have an opinion, doesn’t mean we need to share it all the time.*